Beautiful words on Roswell Rudd’s Trombone for Lovers!

Happy Winter Greetings!

rudd_roswel_trombonef_101bStopping in to report some news on legendary trombonist Roswell Rudd’s beautiful record that I had to the honor to be a part of that included such amazoid luminaries as Bob Dorough, John Medeski, Steven Bernstein, Gary Lucas and more.  I performed the great blues tune “Trouble in Mind”  and had a ball the day we recorded it Upstate State New York on a gorgeous mid-Fall day in 2012.  First UP – Trombone For Lovers cracked the top 50 Jazz Albums by the NPR Jazz Critics Poll, coming in at #41! Well beautiful words have been pouring in and I’d like to share a few of those quotes here:

“Legendary jazz trombonist Roswell Rudd may be 78 years young, but he hasn’t lost a beat as a vibrant musician. On the consistent and enjoyable Trombone for Lovers, Rudd – “with a little help from … friends” – covers songs that are meaningful to him encompassing various genres. On “Baby, It’s Cold Outside”, Rudd and partner in crime Steven Bernstein (slide trumpet) interpret the Loesser vocal classic in dramatic fashion, accompanied by a churchy B3, compliments of John Medeski.


Guest vocalist Fay Victor steals the show on the bluesy “Trouble in Mind
”, with the rhythm section soundly backing her. On “Green Onions”, Rudd and company let loose, with the acclaimed soul tune easily lending itself to jazz. Later, Rudd liberally approaches Duke Ellington’s “Come Sunday”, adventurously changing styles, and breathing new life into the timeless classic. Track after track, Rudd’s musicianship and sharpness impresses, making Trombone for Lovers shine radiantly.”
-Brett Faukner, Popmatters.com

Trombone for Lovers
Sunnyside ***1/2
“An audaciously titled record (!), the band of avant garde trombonist Roswell Rudd, now 78, whose playing over the years has decorated such landmark recordings as Archie Shepp’s Mama Too Tight and Charlie Haden’s Liberation Music Orchestra sets up a ‘Comin’ Home Baby’-like groove on opener ‘Ghost Riders in the Sky’. And uncannily on the very next track the co-writer of ‘Baby’, Bob Dorough, pops up, growlingly, as if by magic on Lennon and McCartney’s ‘Here, There and Everywhere’. With songs drawn from Rudd’s recollections of childhood (“at this time in my life I worship at the altar of melody”, he wrote during the album’s Kickstarter campaign) when he would sing the songs in school or in church here seen as “standards in American song” Rudd is in a core quartet with John Medeski on B3, bassist Richard Hammond and drummer Aaron Comess, with lots of guests including Gary Lucas, Fay Victor, and Sexmob’s Steven Bernstein on a fun set of tunes. As you’d expect with Medeski on the organ it’s a highly infectious groove (carefully weighted on ‘Green Onions’) and while there is something of a raggedy jamming feel throughout, that doesn’t detract; in fact it’s a bonus. The album is not without its great moments, Fay Victor capable of stopping the traffic dead in its tracks on ‘Trouble in Mind’ a performance that simply soars away; Rudd raw and emotional on ‘Unchained Melody’; and showing his soloing imagination on ‘The Relentless Walk’ section of ‘Joe Hill’ segueing into Reggie Bennett’s conscious rap.
-DOWNBEAT MAGAZINE

Roswell Rudd: Trombone for Lovers
(Sunnyside)
“The “Joe Hill” suite at the end takes some getting used to, but since when has organizing been easy? Everything else is just superb: the opening “Ghost Riders in the Sky” with Steven Bernstein’s slide trumpet, Bob Dorough on “Here, There & Everywhere,” Fay Victor on “Trouble in Mind,” Michael Doucet’s violin on “Autumn Leaves” and “Tennessee Waltz,” familiar songs that seem perfect when they pop up: “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” “Struttin’ With Some Barbecue,” “Green Onions,” “Unchained Melody,” “September Song.”
Tom Hull, The Village Voice
The Best Jazz Albums of 2013

Learn more and purchase at www.sunnysiderecords.com